As a Social Security disability beneficiary, an apprenticeship may be a good career choice for you. From their first day of work, apprentices receive a paycheck that is guaranteed to increase as their training progresses.

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Ticket to Work logo and The Seal of the United States Social Security Administration
Ticket to Work logo and The Seal of the United States Social Security Administration
Ticket to Work logo and The Seal of the United States Social Security Administration
Access to Employment Support Services for Social Security Disability Beneficiaries Who Want to Work
 
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Learn About Apprenticeships During National Apprenticeship Week!

Nov 25, 2016

When you hear the word apprentice, you might first think about construction or other skilled trade jobs. But today, the ApprenticeshipUSA system holds nationwide opportunities for training in all industries, including healthcare, IT, advanced manufacturing, transportation and energy.

ApprenticeshipUSA logoWith a network of more than 150,000 employers in more than 1,000 careers, the ApprenticeshipUSA system has trained millions of apprentices during the last 75 years. The average starting wage for an apprenticeship graduate is more than $50,000, and apprentices will earn an average of $300,000 more over their lifetime than their non-apprentice peers.

Last year, President Obama set a goal to double the number of Registered Apprenticeship Programs in the U.S. in the next five years. To help make that happen, the President has declared November 14-20, 2016 National Apprenticeship Week.

What is apprenticeship?

Registered Apprenticeship is a proven approach to prepare workers for jobs while meeting business demands for a highly-skilled workforce. It’s an employer-driven, "learn while you earn" model that combines on-the-job training with the hiring employer with job-related instruction in courses tied to achieving national skills standards. The model includes progressive increases in an apprentice’s skills and wages.

Why should you consider an apprenticeship?

As a Social Security disability beneficiary, an apprenticeship may be a good career choice for you. From their first day of work, apprentices receive a paycheck that is guaranteed to increase as their training progresses. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, other benefits of apprenticeship include:

  • Hands-on career training. Apprentices receive practical on-the-job training in a wide range of occupations and industries such as healthcare, construction, information technology, transportation, energy and advanced manufacturing.
  • An education. Apprentices may be able to earn college credit toward an associate’s or bachelor’s degree.
  • A career. Once the apprenticeship is complete, workers are on their way to a successful long-term career with a competitive salary and little or no educational debt.
  • National credential. When an apprentice graduates from a career training program, they earn a certified portable credential accepted by industries and employers across the U.S.

Source: https://www.dol.gov/apprenticeship/toolkit/toolkitfaq.htm#2b

Additional Resources

About Ticket to Work

Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for people ages 18 through 64 who receive Social Security disability benefits (SSI or SSDI) and want to work. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. It helps people with disabilities move toward financial independence and connects them with the services and support they need to succeed in the workforce.

Learn More

To learn more about Ticket to Work, visit www.socialsecurity.gov/work and contact the Ticket to Work Help Line at 1-866-968-7842 (Voice) or 1-866-833-2967 (TTY) Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET. Ask a representative to send you a list of service providers or find providers on your own with the Ticket to Work Find Help tool.