Choose Work Blog
Image of the Choose Work Blog logo

April is Occupational Therapy Month: How OT Can Help You Reach Your Goals

By Stephanie Yamkovenko

Last month, a new Department of Labor rule went into effect that requires federal contractors to employ a minimum of 7% of employees with disabilities, in an effort to address the high jobless rates among people with disabilities. Contractors that have 50 or more employees or more than $50,000 in government work have to comply—this includes companies such as Boeing, Dell, and AT&T as well as 40,000 others.

As the companies prepare to comply with the new rule, people with disabilities may soon find more employment opportunities available for them.

The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA)’s members can help people with disabilities prepare to enter the workforce or participate in other meaningful activities and occupations to promote independence. AOTA is celebrating Occupational Therapy Month this April to promote the distinct value that the profession brings to people with a variety of disabilities (physical, developmental, cognitive, etc.). Below are a few examples of how occupational therapy can help people with disabilities.

Read More...

April is Occupational Therapy Month: What Can Occupational Therapy Do For You?

By Stephanie Yamkovenko

Last year’s World Report on Disability found that there are 1 billion people in the world with disabilities. Many individuals with disabilities can’t find jobs—in fact, 71% of Americans with disabilities do not participate in the workforce (compared with 30% of individuals without disabilities).

AOTA As the occupational therapy profession celebrates Occupational Therapy (OT) Month this April, the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) wants all individuals with disabilities to know that, no matter their disability, everyone should have the opportunity to participate in meaningful activities and occupations. Occupational therapy practitioners work with individuals with a variety of disabilities (physical, developmental, cognitive, etc.) to help them discover ways to participate fully in life.

Young adults with developmental disabilities, such as autism or Down syndrome, can work with an occupational therapy practitioner to transition from  high school to a  life after graduation—whether that’s finding a job, going to college, or developing strategies to live as independently as possible. Read the Role of Occupational Therapy in Facilitating Employment of Individuals With Developmental Disabilities.

Read More...